IMPROVING INTERACTIOIN AND RELATION WITH PEERS THROUGH CLASS ACTIVITY IN CLASS 5TH

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The role of the family context in the Regulation of emotions
The role of the family context in the Regulation of emotions

IMPROVING INTERACTIOIN AND RELATION WITH PEERS THROUGH CLASS ACTIVITY IN CLASS 5TH

Theme: Children’s Socio-emotional Interaction.

Sub-theme: (Interaction and relation with peers)

Topic: IMPROVING INTERACTIOIN AND RELATION WITH PEERS THROUGH CLASS ACTIVITY IN CLASS 5TH.

1.Why did you select this specific sub-theme and topic? Relate it to your experience / problem in your classroom / institution.

Reason behind the selection of the topic:  Although, well managed school provide an environment in which Class activities conducted for students to improve interaction and relation with peers”. “Many research studies have resulted that a conducive classroom environment promotes student’s interaction and relation through Class activities”. “Classroom management strategies are a crucial part of teachers’ success in creating a safe and effective learning environment for students in building interaction and relation”. “The purpose of education is to provide a safe and friendly environment in order for interaction and relation with peers”.  “Therefore, teachers should know how to use and apply strategies that will allow and also help students to improve student interaction and relation with peers.”.

The following reasons behind lack of student interaction and relation with peers which was observed in the school. This research identifies the solution of these.

1.Focus Just on Books Reading:

Some school teachers just focus on books reading. They do not involve the students in any other physical task like Class activities which can be helpful for building confidence and interaction with other students.

2.Poor Mental Health:

Poor mental health is also associated with rapid social change, stressful work conditions, gender discrimination, social exclusion, unhealthy lifestyle, physical ill-health and human rights violations. There are specific psychological and personality factors that make people vulnerable to mental health problems.

 3.Emotional Immaturity:

Emotional immaturity as a condition where a person hasn’t given up the desires or fantasies of their childhoods. These desires and fantasies have to do with them being the center of the universe. They can also even involve “bending” reality to be what they want.

4.Irresponsibility:

Irresponsible is not capable of handling assignments or taking responsibility. An example of an irresponsible person is someone who constantly forgets to do her assignments.

5.Poor Home Environment:

Home environment is usually a place in which an individual or a family can rest and be able to storeineraction and relation. But if home environment not motivated like parents quarrels with on another all the time, then this thing has most negative impact on the mind of students.

6.Lack of Interest in School Activities:

Lack of interest can be caused by difficultly concentrating, family problems, emotional difficulties, learning disabilities, and many other factors. Having said that, as a teacher, you still have to do your best and try to get them to learn at least the basics of any subject.

7.Resistance to School Rules and Regulations:

Policies are important because they help a school establish rules and procedures and create standards of quality for learning and safety, as well as expectations and accountability. Without these, schools would lack the structure and function necessary to provide the educational needs of students. But some students not follow this. These things lead to decrease in ineraction and relationof students.

I have selected the above topic because now a day it is a common problem of all. Students have lack of ineraction and relation during the period. Students do not focus on ineraction and relationon the base of following reasons. I selected the above topic so this research identifies the solution of this problem.

2.What was your discussion with your colleague / friend / senior teacher or supervisor regarding the problem.

(Provide your discussion with your colleague or supervisor for better understanding of the problem and alternate solutions).

Interaction and relation is”the belief in one’s capabilities to organize and execute the courses of action required to manage prospective situations.” Interaction and relationis a person’s belief in his or her ability to succeed in a particular situation.

When I discuss the whole matter improving interaction and relation with peers through class activity in class 5thwith my other colleagues and senior teachers it was argued thatinteraction and relation and encouragement should be a major area of concern to teachers and students. This is the concern of this chapter which tends to summarize what is essential to be known about the interaction and relation building process as it relates to Class activities, rewarding system and encouragement. Almost all the teachers and colleagues were in favor of the statement that the Class activitiesand encouragement are possessing self-efficacy. BecauseClass activities and interaction and relation are very alternative. No any students can get fluency in one skill without other skill. The researcher conducted this study which focused on the Interaction of Interaction and relation that lead to good behavior and performance of students.

A teacher’s most important activity in a typical class environment is the one related to classroom management that leading to build interaction and relation in students through Class activities. Appreciation ultimately enhances good behavior and personality like praise, reward offering. But punishment cannot apply for all students. Punishment put negative impact on some students like punished the students. Learning and teaching cannot take place in a mismanaged classroom. In limited terms, classroom management is the management of the class by educational motives. Contemporary understanding of classroom management approach calls for conceiving class as a system. Class in educational system is a subsystem of educational management and at the same time a formal organization. Within this framework, classroom management could be defined as the process of arranging the classroom environment and its physical structure under the laws in order to satisfy the expectations of the educational system, the curriculum, the school, the lesson, the teacher and of the students, constituting the rules, relation patterns and administration of class order; planning, presenting and evaluating educational activities, recognizing students’ assets; providing student motivation; arranging classroom communication pattern; attaining classroom discipline,  effective and productive employment of time, human and material resources in order to prevent students’ undesired behavior.

Interaction and relationare a response, which an individual show to his environment at different times. Interaction and relation can be positive or negative, effective or ineffective, conscious or unconscious, overt or covert, and voluntary or involuntary. Interaction and relation can be regarded as any action of an organism that changes its relationship to its environment. Interaction and relationprovide outputs from the organism to the environment. The meaning of interaction and relation is to conduct or carry oneself or behavior in what we do, especially in response to outside stimuli anything that an organism does that involves action and response to stimulation. The main purpose of this study is to investigate the role of Class activitiesin interaction of student’s interaction and relation of Nobal Public Model School.

3.What did you find about the problem in the existing literature (books / articles/websites)?

(Explore books and online resources to know what and how has been already done regarding this problem).

Effective learning process is directly related to the effective classroom management. Without effective classroom management, teaching learning has no fruitful and productive outcomes. Effective classroom management depends on the competencies (capacity, proficiency) of teachers. Good managers devise and announce classroom rules and regulations at the beginning of session in order to control classroom disruptive behaviors and make the classroom atmosphere favorable for teaching learning process.

Teachers use a variety of Class activities and stimulus (encouragement) to improve interaction and relation with peers. According to I vancevich and Matteson (1990:171) “teachers use a variety of Class activities to attract and maintain students and to motivate them to achieve their teaching goals.” Rewarding students is therefore vital for the teaching success. Incentives are external stimuli which can be used as stimulants to productivity.

When a behavior leads to desirable outcomes, it is more likely to occur in future situations. Therefore, reinforcing is merely the impact seen by the reinforcing agent. To determine whether an event is capable of reinforcing its impact should be considered.

Armstrong (2012), states that “outdoor activities deal with the strategies, policies and processes required to ensure that the people’s value and contributions they make to achieving interactional goals of teaching and rewarded.” It can therefore be seen that rewards play an important role in motivating students to perform at their best and also to maintain top performers. Lathan’s (2002:45) observes that “teachers provide rewards to their personnel in order to try to motivate their performance and encourage their loyalty and maintained.”

As already demonstrated, extrinsic motivation is a deeper issue than it come because it may undermine intrinsic (natural) motivation under certain conditions and promote it under others conditions. (Williams & Stock dale, 2004). However, it is worthwhile for all teachers have an understanding of extrinsic Class activities because “many of the tasks that educators want their students to perform are not inherently interesting and knowing”. How to promote more active and volitional (a choice or decision made) forms of extrinsic motivation becomes an essential strategy for successful teaching’. (Ryan & Deci,2000).

It is important to understand that before analyzing different Class activities options, factors that affect reward strategies and practices. Each teacher is faced with a number of internal and external factors that affect the Interaction and relation is structured and administered. Armstrong (2010), identifies teaching culture, sector or work environment, students, teaching strategy, school climate as key internal variables that affect reward strategies. Each of these factors are different for each school and the teachers will develop a reward system based on how it values each of the variables. Armstrong (2010:17).

These factors play an important role and may force teachers to take certain decisions. In discussing different types of Class activities and incentives it is important to first categorize these. Rewards can be viewed as intrinsic or extrinsic. Intrinsic rewards “are intangible (invisible) rewards concerned with the work environment (quality of education, the teachers teaching) recognition, performance management and learning and interaction” Armstrong (2002:99). Kinicki and Kreitner (1998), state that financial, material and social rewards are extrinsic rewards because they come from the environment.

To apply ainteraction and relation to a classroom student, a teacher must first understand what a interaction and relation is and what the advantages n disadvantages are when using it. The term reward is broadly defined as a tool that teacher use to try and reinforce a desired behavior (Wetzel and Mercer, 2003). The elements that determine the effectiveness of a reward are how it is delivered by the teachers and how it is perceived by the student (Wetzel and Mercer, 2012). If a teacher delivers a reward for good behavior, the student must make the connection between the right behavior and the reward. If students think they were rewarded for a different behavior, then the given reward will not be effective, and the student will have associated getting a reward with the wrong behavior (Wetzel and Mercer, 2012). So, teachers need to make sure that when giving rewards, student understand why they received them.

Categories of Reward

Rewards can be broken down into categories;

  1. Intrinsic rewards
  2. Extrinsic rewards

Intrinsic Rewards

When a student receives an intrinsic reward, it is because they have completed an assignment or task due to internal motivation (Williams & Stockdale, 2004). Some common intrinsic rewards are ‘‘task completion, feedback or result, acquisition of knowledge or skill, and a sense of mastery’’ (Wetzel & Stockdale). However, this award can be beneficial compared to extrinsic rewards, because they do not require an external stimulus, such as the teacher. The student will stay on task because they are motivated by their own determinations. However, intrinsic reward will not always be Satisfactory for students, since they may not have any internal motivation to complete a task.

Extrinsic Rewards

Extrinsic rewards are rewards given by someone outside of the individual, such as a teacher (Wetzel & Mercer). Some common extrinsic rewards are ‘‘primary objects, tangible objects, token systems, social approval, and project activities’’. In 1991, Newby found by new teachers use extrinsic rewards and motivation more than any other strategy. Extrinsic rewards may motivate student complete tasks that they would otherwise disregard. However, this reward can have a negative effect, where students grow dependent on them for motivation in completing their assignments.

In the classroom, most rewards will be a combination of extrinsic and intrinsic factors. For instance, students may engage in an activity both because of what, they will learn will be the intrinsic rewards, while the grade that they receive will be the extrinsic rewards.

It is important to understand, before analyzing different reward options, factors that affect reward strategies and practices. Each organization is faced with a number of internal and external factors that affect the reward system is structured and administered. (Armstrong, 2010) identifies organizational culture, the organizations business or sector or work environment, people, business strategy, political and social climate as key internal variables that affect reward strategies. Each of these factors are different for each organization and the organization will then develop a reward system based on how it values each of the variables. For example, “Bankers, entrepreneurial directors or sales representatives will be more interested in financial incentives than, say people engaged in charitable work” (Armstrong, 2010:17).

External aspects that may affect reward strategies include globalization, rate of pay in the marketplace, the economy, societal factors, legislation and trade unions, (Armstrong, 2010). These factors play an important role and may force organizations to take certain decisions for example trade unions in South Africa have a big influence in worker package and incentives.

In discussing different types of rewards and incentives it is important to first categorize these. Rewards can be viewed as intrinsic or extrinsic. Intrinsic rewards “are intangible rewards concerned with the work environment (quality of working life, work life balance) recognition, performance management and learning and interaction” Armstrong (2002:99). Kinicki and Kreitner (1998) state that financial, material and social rewards are extrinsic rewards because they emanate from the environment.

Tom Peters argues that by following the right method of rewarding, one can obtain excellent results. The Theorist Edward. Lorler believe that reward must be dependent on performance (Cohen, 2013).

The biggest mistake any parents can make is to delay the reward for an appropriate behavior. A reward will be most effective if it immediately follows the behavior. So that the desirable behavior is validated.  (Patterson, 1983). Rey states that during the delay between the behavior and reward, the subject may exhibit, other behavior. Thus, the targeted behavior may remain undeveloped since the unwanted behavior is also reinforced. (Seyf, 2011).

4.What were the major variables / construct of your project? Give definitions / description from literature?

(What are the key terms in your topic or study? What do you mean of these terms? What particular meaning you will attach to the term when used in this project).

Variables of the study:

Total three variables included in this research. two were independent variables and one was dependent variable. Class activities and encouragement used as independent variables and student’s interaction and relation used as dependent variable.

1.Class activities:

Activities include backpacking, canoeing, canyoning, caving, climbing, hiking, hill walking, hunting, kayaking, and rafting. Broader groupings include water sports, snow sports, and horseback riding. Outdoor recreation allows individuals to engage in physical activity whilst being immersed in nature.

2.Students Encouragement:

Tangible forms of encouragement give students a visual reminder that they have the power to learn and succeed. They are especially effective when used sparingly or in moderation after students achieve learning milestones in the classroom

  • Give Positive Feedback. …
  • Set Realistic Expectations and Celebrate When They Are Met. …
  • Let Your Own Excitement Come Through. …
  • Vary Your Teaching Methods. …
  • Facilitate Don’t Dominate. …
  • Make Topics Practical. …
  • Show StudentsTheir Own Successes. …
  • Get Out of the Book

 3.Interaction and relation:

Interaction and relation are”the belief in one’s capabilities to organize and execute the courses of action required to manage prospective situations with their peers.” Interaction and relation are a person’s belief in his or her ability to succeed in a particular situation.Interaction and relation are about having the strong, positive belief that you have the capacity and the skills to achieve your goals.Interaction and relationaffect every area of human endeavor. By determining the beliefs, a person holds regarding their power to affect situations, it strongly influences both the power a person actually has to face challenges competently and the choices a person is most likely to make.

5.what did you want to achieve in this research project?

(Objective/ purpose of the study; what was the critical question that was tried to be answered in this project).

  • Research Objectives

Purpose of the study the improving interaction and relation with peers through class activity in class 5th. So, the study will focus on the causes of problems of students regarding this.” In order to achieve said aims, following objectives are designed:

Objectives of the Study

Following was the main objective of the study.

  1. To explore the relationship between Class activities and student’s interaction and relation with peers.
  2. To explore the relationship between student encouragement and interaction and relation with peers.
  3. To find out the reasons behind the lack of interaction and relation with peers.
  4. To give suggestion for the improvement of the situation.

Research Questions of the study

  • What is the relationship between Class activities and student’s interaction and relation with peers?
  • What is the relationship between student encouragement and interaction and relation with peers?
  • What are the reasons behind the lack of interaction and relation with peers?

RQ4. What are the suggestions for the improvement of the situation?

6.Who were the participants in your project?

(Give details of the individuals or groups who were focused in this project e.g., the early grade students whose handwriting in Urdu was not good or the students of class 8 who did not have good communication skills).

Population

The population of the study comprised girls studying at Noble Public Model School Tunsa Sharif of Pakistan.

Sample

A total of “40” students were taken as a sample of the study. Lodhran Region was taken as Convenient sample by applying the Matched Pair Random Sampling Technique. So, total sample size was 40 respondents including female students. This sample provide appropriate knowledge regarding all the students of the school they studying in the school.

7.How did you try to solve the problem?

(Narrate the process step wise. Procedure of intervention and date collection)

Research Methodology

All research methods and techniques that will be used in this study are given below.

Research Method:

Research method may describe into three forms: Quantitative Method, Qualitative method and Mixed Method. In the study, quantitative research method was used, because data was collected by using questionnaire in the light of students’ and teachers’ perception.

Research Design:

It is descriptive and survey research about “improving interaction and relation with peers through class activity in class 5th”.

Population:

A population is otherwise called an all-around characterized gathering of people or questions known to have comparative attributes. All people or protests inside a specific population typically have a typical, restricting trademark or characteristic. The target population of this study was the students of public school of Pakistan. The data was collected from student’s public schools by filling up the questionnaire.

Sampling Technique

Convenient sampling technique was used in this study.

 Sample

In research a sample is a gathering of individuals, that are taken from a bigger population for estimation. The example ought to be illustrative of the population to guarantee that we can sum up the discoveries from the exploration test to the population all in all. 40 students were selected from Noble Public Model school.

 

 Data collection procedure

 

Data was collected by through questionnaires. One questionnaire was filled by one student according to his point of view. In this way 40 questionnaire filled by 40 respondents. On the base of this data know the opinion of students, find out the problems of students, and provided solution to sort out these problems. Open ended and closed ended questions were used for the purpose of data collection. In closed ended questionnaires 5 Likert point scale questions were developed in the form of strongly agreed (SA=5), Agree (A=4), Undecided (UD=3), Disagree (DA=2) and strongly Disagree (DA=1).

Data Analysis

Data collection measure means the tool through which the data can be collected”. There are different sources of data collection like scales, proxies, and questions. In this study the researcher used appropriate research tools and software to analysis of data, like; SPSS 18 software analysis in which descriptive analysis was used to find out the frequency, percentage, means and minimum/maximum values etc.

8.What kind of instrument was used to collect the data? How was the instrument developed?

(For example, observation, Questionnaire, rating scale, interview, student work, portfolio, test etc.)

Instruments:

The study used questionnaires as the main research instrument. Questionnaire is the form in which different questions asked by the sample of the study to complete the goal of the study.

Questionnaires were three in counting and labeled as:

1-Closed Ended Questionnaire for students about Class activities and its impact on student’s interaction and relation.

2-Close Ended Questionnaire for students about interaction and relation of students.

3-Questionnaire for students’ suggestions for effective encouragement in the classroom.

Questionnaire for students:

The following main questions guided the collection and analysis of data for the present study. All the information that containing in these questions ultimately helpful for developing interaction and relation in students.

  1. All students are motivated to perform well in Class activities?
  2. Different techniques used to increase the interaction and relation of students?
  3. Rewards encourage the student to improve confidence?
  4. Is confidence necessary for building interaction and relation?
  5. Class activities are helpful to interact with peers?
  6. Class activities improve the interaction and relation of students?
  7. Are the students happy after participating in Class activities?
  8. Encouragement of the students develop interaction and relation?
  9. Does the misbehavior of students is change after interaction and relation?
  10. Teacher give opportunity to whole class to improve interaction and relation with peers?

Instruments, participants and procedures of quantitative data collection are presented in the following sections.

Data analysis

After the collection of the data, it was tabulated. Questionnaires were analyzed. After collecting data, the simple percentage and frequency model was applied to evaluate the score on different performance indicators to check the significance.

9.What were the findings and conclusion?

Findings:

  1. Overall majority (98%) of the respondents agreed that Are students are motivated to perform well in Class activities.
  2. Overall majority (92%) of the respondents agreed that Different techniques used to increase the interaction and relation of students.
  3. Overall majority (98%) of the respondents agreed that Rewards encourage the student to improve confidence
  4. Overall majority (97%) of the respondents agreed that Is confidence necessary for building interaction and relation.
  5. Overall majority (95%) of the respondents agreed thatClass activities are helpful to interact with peers.
  6. Overall majority (96%) of the respondents agreed that Class activities improve the interaction and relation of students.
  7. Overall majority (98%) of the respondents agreed that Are the students happy after participating in Class activities.
  8. Overall majority (99%) of the respondents agreed that Encouragement of the students develop interaction and relation.
  9. Overall majority (92%) of the respondents agreed that misbehavior of students is change after interaction and relation
  10. Overall majority (95%) of the respondents agreed that Teacher give opportunity to whole class to improve interaction and relation with peers.

Conclusions

The researcher in this study, from the findings concluded by analysis the following conclusion:

Class activities are the most powerful tool of student’s interaction and relation with others. Encouragement to increase a response not only works better, but allows both parties to focus on the positive aspects of the situation. Punishment, when applied immediately following the negative behavior can be effective, but problems may result when it is not applied consistently. Punishment can also invoke other negative emotional responses, such as anger and resentment.

Teacher-student relationships are crucial for the success of both teachers and students. As a feature of classroom administration, such connections are the most noteworthy factor in deciding an educator’s work as effective. The impact of instructor’s conduct assumes a critical job in the scholastic accomplishment of understudies. An instructor needs to show outstanding sympathy, constancy, industriousness, truthfulness, examine introduction, trustworthiness and adaptability as a man. Instructors likewise should be mindful in the manner by which anything that a living being does that includes activity and reaction to incitement.

Teaching is the activity of teachers for the purposes of education. So, it is the duty of teachers to knowledge the students as well as to develop interaction and relation in them through Class activities. Teaching is an arrangement and manipulation of a situation in which building students interaction and relation.

That good classroom management strategies show that reward system develop discipline, critical thinking, student’s confidence policies, punctuality, self-discipline, leadership skills, confidence and socialization in students According to the perceptions of students (in open-ended question), majority of the respondents agreed that students ‘Class activitieshave a stronger effect on developing interaction and relation, punctuality, student’s confidence policies, leadership skill, teamwork, character interaction and adaptability.

10.Summary of the Project

University recommended me some developing basic skills in which theme and sub theme. My topic that I choose IMPROVING INTERACTION AND RELATION WITH PEERS THROUGH CLASS ACTIVITY IN CLASS 5TH.I choose this topic because I have to face problem about interaction and relation in the school. Because students feel shy when they have to perform in Class activities. It is difficult to create interaction and relation in the students during teaching.

The sample comprised a total of 40 students drawn from Noble public Model School of district Lodhran. They were selected by simple random sampling technique.

This study investigated student’s interaction and relation through Class activities among Noble Public school’s students. It also investigated the effects of school environment and management related differences on students’ academic performance in the concept of measurement when taught using hygienic environment and Unhygienic environment in the class.

Questionnaire Instrument used for students for data collection. Research design was descriptive. The result was finding that the reward system and encouragement develops interaction and relation in students regarding study. Teachers’ behavior and teaching method also impact on students ‘behavior.

11.How do you feel about this practice? What have you learnt?

The aim of this study was to investigate the role of improving interaction and relation with peers through class activity in class 5th.  My research in rural area basic skills. My project participants were the students of Noble Public Model School situated in Lodhran district. In rural areas mostly people maintain discipline but not all.

Classroom positive reinforcement atmosphere is very important element in study because it helps in the learning of students. So, I used different technique for creating motivational atmosphere in the class to participate in Class activities to develop interaction and relation. Students were happy and learn quickly on the base of hygienic atmosphere in the class. I feel pleasure. I think in our rural areas teacher create motivational atmosphere in the class through rewarding system then students have no problem ofinteraction and relation. Students’ response to the implementation of teaching if they teach in hygienic atmosphere. I created hygienic atmosphere in the class through different activities. I learn that how to improve the student’s interaction and relation during the study. Finally, I feel satisfied.

12.What has it added to your professional skills as a teacher?

It added some new things in my knowledge key points are given below.

  • It made me good organizer.
  • It made me ready for everything that is throw their way.
  • It enabled me how to create motivational atmosphere in the classroom to develop interaction and relation.
  • It built confidence in me that how to deal with rural areas students for improving interaction and relation through Class activities.
  • Before these activities I was not a good organizer.it made me innovative.
  • I started find out new things before I have not insert. But when I started my project a grate change brought in my thinking.
  • I capable to find out new things.
  • It made me good effective teacher and mentor.
  • It made me good role model.
  • It made me confident. Teacher discipline can help influence other to be a better person.
  • It made me capable to understand how to create classroom atmosphere according to student’s psyche to develop interaction and relation.
  • It tells me how negative punishing atmosphere effect on student’s personality level and communication.

Q.13 List the works you cited in your project.

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